100 best G-rated movies to watch as a family

Using data from IMDb and Metacritic, Stacker compiled a list of the 100 best G-rated movies to watch as a family, including classics like "Peter Pan" and "Forbidden Planet."

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Universal Pictures

The earliest movies, some only mere seconds long, were made in the last decade of the 19th century after Thomas Edison invented the kinetoscope. As technology quickly advanced, the demand for more moving pictures that were longer in length and had more elaborate storylines increased. By the early 20th century, the motion picture industry as we know it today was beginning to emerge. And the rest, as they say, is history.

The motion picture industry has changed dramatically since those early days, including how films are rated for audiences. For example, in 1922, in the early days of studios, William Hays formed the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America. This governing body would go on to create the moral censorship guidelines, or the Hays Code, as it was often referred to, which provided regulations about the types of content that could or could not be shown on screen. The Hays Code, which remained in place for nearly 40 years, included incredibly strict rules that dictated films to only present correct standards of life, crime and immorality could never be portrayed in a positive light, and religion could never be depicted in a mocking manner.

Then, in 1968, the modern voluntary movie rating system was born. The new system rated films G, M, R, and X and focused less on determining what audiences could see and more on giving parents a system that they could use to decide what was appropriate for their families. This modern-day system has gone through several rounds of refinement over the years, but since the beginning, the G rating has indicated that a film is appropriate for audiences of all ages.

Stacker has rounded up a list of the 100 best G-rated films to watch as a family. Data was compiled on all G-rated movies to come up with a Stacker score—a weighted index split evenly between IMDb and Metacritic scores. To qualify, the film had to be listed as G-rated on IMDb, have a Metascore, and have at least 5,000 IMDb votes. Ties were broken by the number of votes.

From "The Sound of Music" to "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," any one of these movies would make a great pick for your next family movie night.

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#100. The Out of Towners (1970)

Jalem Productions

- Director: Arthur Hiller
- Stacker score: 77.2
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 101 minutes

In "The Out of Towners," small-town Ohio couple George and Gwen set out for the big city (New York City, to be precise) after George receives a job interview there. Travel snafus make their journey a frustrating one, and it takes a plane, train, taxi, and some good old-fashioned walking to get George and Gwen to their destination. According to John Mahoney of the Hollywood Reporter, the Neil Simon flick is "the closest the sound film has come to recapturing the genius of the silent movie chase comedy."

#99. The Time Machine (1960)

George Pal Productions

- Director: George Pal
- Stacker score: 77.2
- Metascore: 67
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 103 minutes

A faithful adaptation of the H.G. Wells classic, "The Time Machine" tells the story of a scientist who tempts fate by creating a machine that allows him to jump into three different periods of the future. Special effects, including the design of the time machine, were a major hurdle for the filmmakers, but in the end, they managed to pull off an impressive feat and won an Oscar for Best Special Effects.

#98. The Italian Job (1969)

Oakhurst Productions

- Director: Peter Collinson
- Stacker score: 77.2
- Metascore: 70
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 99 minutes

In the 1969 version of "The Italian Job," Michael Caine plays a British crook who plans to steal millions of dollars of gold from a convoy of cars in Turin, Italy, by fixing the traffic lights in order to establish a gridlock that would allow him to sneak away. Irreverent and goofy, the film has one of the best and most copied cliffhanger endings of all time.

#97. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: James Algar, Clyde Geronimi, Jack Kinney
- Stacker score: 77.7
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 68 minutes

"The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad" is actually two different animated stories packaged into a single film. The first, about the wealthy Mr. Toad who sets out to get a car any way he can, is derived from "The Wind and the Willows," while the second, about a schoolmaster who's caught in a love triangle and deathly afraid of the Headless Horseman, was pulled from "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Originally, the movie was set to be called "Two Fabulous Characters" drawing a clearer distinction between the tales and characters, whose only real link is how prone they are to disaster.

#96. The Last Unicorn (1982)

Rankin/Bass Productions

- Directors: Jules Bass, Arthur Rankin Jr.
- Stacker score: 77.7
- Metascore: 70
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Mia Farrow lends her voice to the titular character in "The Last Unicorn," playing a young, frightened creature who sets out to save her kind from the evil hands of King Haggard, finding help from a gentle sorcerer named Schmendrick along the way. Described as highly imaginative and innovative, the cartoon, which deals with themes like loss and regret, is based on a novel by Peter S. Beagle, who also wrote the screenplay. An interesting note: the animation was completed by a studio that would go on to be known as Studio Ghibli.

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#95. The Rescuers (1977)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: John Lounsbery, Wolfgang Reitherman, Art Stevens
- Stacker score: 77.7
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 77 minutes

"The Rescuers" is a Disney classic about a mouse detective named Miss Bianca, and her assistant, Bernard, both members of the Rescue Aid Society, who spring into action to save a human girl named Penny from the evil Madame Medusa. For a while, there was a rumor flying around that a topless woman could briefly be seen in the background of a scene, but have no fear, the images have been edited out in every current release of the film.

#94. Oklahoma! (1955)

Rogers and Hammerstein Productions

- Director: Fred Zinnemann
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 145 minutes

A film adaptation of the famous Rogers and Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" tells the story of a young woman from the rural territory and the two men vying for her affection. The two composers retained creative control over this film, which resulted in it more closely following the storyline and plot beats of their original stage show. Only two musical numbers were eventually cut from the score.

#93. The Great Mouse Detective (1986)

Walt Disney Pictures

- Directors: Ron Clements, Burny Mattinson, David Michener, John Musker
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 74 minutes

Basil of Baker Street, a mouse detective, lives in the same London flat as Sherlock Holmes and shares his same mystery-solving abilities. In "The Great Mouse Detective" he's hired by the mouse daughter of an abducted toy maker to find her father and uncovers a plot against the crown along the way. The film earned $25.3 million at the box office, which helped Disney Studios recoup some of the losses from "The Black Cauldron," an expensive flop that had premiered the year before.

#92. The Princess and the Frog (2009)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Ron Clements, John Musker
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 97 minutes

Set in New Orleans during the 1910s and '20s, "The Princess and the Frog" is about a young woman with dreams of owning her own restaurant, who kisses a frog prince, is turned into a frog herself, and must seek the help of a voodoo priestess in order to return to her human form. The film is notable among the Disney classics, as it is the first film to feature African American characters since 1946's "Song of the South," a deeply racist movie that has been locked in the Disney vault for years.

#91. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 91 minutes

"The Hunchback of Notre Dame" contains heavier themes than some other Disney movies, like abuse of authority, racism, and the importance of civic action to end injustices. Loosely based on Victor Hugo's novel of the same name, Disney studios actually expected the film to get a PG rating from the MPAA rating board because of these heavier themes. In the end, it kept the G rating and opened in 1996 to an underwhelming response at the box office.

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#90. The Emperor's New Groove (2000)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Director: Mark Dindal
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 70
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 78 minutes

An arrogant young emperor is taught his lesson after a scheming adviser turns him into a llama in "The Emperor's New Groove." Set in the ancient Incan Empire, the film was originally titled "Kingdom of the Sun" and would have been a "Prince and the Pauper"-type tale until a total overhaul gave us this classic, comedy gem.

#89. The Sound of Music (1965)

Robert Wise Productions

- Director: Robert Wise
- Stacker score: 78.3
- Metascore: 63
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 172 minutes

Movie musical "The Sound of Music" took the world by storm, earning $158.7 million at the box office and taking home five Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Based on the last musical Rodgers and Hammerstein ever made, the movie tells the story of a governess (Julie Andrews) who falls in love with her employer (Christopher Plummer) and is forced to flee Austria with him and their seven children after they refuse to join the Nazi party.

#88. The Parent Trap (1961)

Walt Disney Productions

- Director: David Swift
- Stacker score: 78.8
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 129 minutes

In "The Parent Trap," twin sisters Susan and Sharon, who were separated at birth, meet at a summer camp and plan to switch places in an attempt to get their parents back together. Hayley Mills stars as both sisters, a feat that was accomplished by a trick shot that allowed her to appear in two places at one time. Originally, the film contained very few of these processed shots, but as soon as Walt Disney saw how seamless they looked, he ordered more to be added.

#87. Winnie the Pooh (2011)

Walt Disney Pictures

- Directors: Stephen J. Anderson, Don Hall
- Stacker score: 78.8
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 63 minutes

Three of A.A. Milne's Hundred Acre Wood stories are brought together to create this 2011 "Winnie the Pooh" movie. The gentle hand animation adds a level of magic to this movie that follows the crew as they search for Eeyore's missing tail and set out to save Christopher Robin from what may be a possible abduction. Appropriate for even the youngest viewers, there's nothing in this movie that could possibly inspire nightmares.

#86. Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971)

Wolper Pictures Ltd.

- Director: Mel Stuart
- Stacker score: 78.8
- Metascore: 67
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 100 minutes

A screen adaptation of the Roald Dahl book "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory" is about a poor kid named Charlie Bucket who finds a golden ticket that gains him entrance to a famed candy factory alongside four other children. Starring Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka, the film was oddly financed by the Quaker Oats Company, which was looking to make a movie that could promote their new candy, the Wonka Bar. After purchasing the rights to the story, the company shifted around the words in the title in order to make the tie-in more obvious.

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#85. Cars (2006)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: John Lasseter, Joe Ranft
- Stacker score: 78.8
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 117 minutes

When racing car Lightning McQueen falls out of his trailer on the way to an important race, he winds up in Radiator Springs, where he meets new faces like Tow Mater and Sally and learns the true meaning of friendship. Aside from the fact that the cars can talk, the film was noted for its realism, and most of the characters in the film are based on real cars, like a 1960s Volkswagen Microbus and a 1959 Chevy Impala. "Cars" was such a success that it has since spawned a whole franchise of movies and a Disney+ TV show.

#84. The King and I (1956)

Twentieth Century Fox

- Director: Walter Lang
- Stacker score: 79.3
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 133 minutes

A big-screen version of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical, "The King and I" is about a widowed governess who sets out to tutor the wives and children of the King of Siam on the English language and customs. Starring Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr, the movie was nominated for nine Academy Awards, winning five.

#83. A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon (2019)

Aardman Animations

- Directors: Will Becher, Richard Phelan
- Stacker score: 79.9
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 86 minutes

A sci-fi, claymation movie, "A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon" begins with an alien spacecraft crash landing on Mossy Bottom Farm. Shaun quickly befriends the creature inside, helping him find a way to return home before being captured by a government agency. While not exactly the most thought-provoking movie on this list, it has managed to retain a respectable audience rating on IMDb.

#82. The Secret Garden (1993)

Warner Bros.

- Director: Agnieszka Holland
- Stacker score: 79.9
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 101 minutes

"The Secret Garden" is based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's tale of an orphaned girl and a sickly boy who uncover a hidden garden in the imposing mansion they call home and turn it into an oasis of their own. Produced by Francis Ford Coppola, the film's biggest star is Dame Maggie Smith, who received a BAFTA nomination in the Best Supporting Actress category for her role as Mrs. Medlock.

#81. Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

The Mirisch Production Company

- Director: Norman Jewison
- Stacker score: 79.9
- Metascore: 67
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 181 minutes

An Oscar-winning adaptation of a popular Broadway musical, "Fiddler on the Roof" is about life in a Russian Jewish village pre-revolution. Tevye, the main character, is the father of five daughters, and he spends much of his time seeking to marry them off while still maintaining the cultural and religious traditions that are being eaten away by outside influences. The movie is cheerful and affirmative while showing deep respect for the values and traditions of this specific group of people.

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#80. Hercules (1997)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Ron Clements, John Musker
- Stacker score: 79.9
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 93 minutes

One of Disney's only forays into Greek mythology, "Hercules" is about the half-man, half-god who was forced to live on Earth among mortals and prove his worth in order to regain his spot on Mount Olympus with the gods. The animated feature starred the vocal talents of actors like James Woods, Tate Donovan, Susan Egan, and Danny DeVito. It's been recently reported that Disney has a live-action remake of this classic film in the works.

#79. Mulan (1998)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Tony Bancroft, Barry Cook
- Stacker score: 79.9
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 87 minutes

Based on the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan, "Mulan" was the first movie in the Disney oeuvre to feature an Asian protagonist. The story, about a young woman who steps up to defend her country in her father's place and ends up saving all of China, won rave reviews from critics for bringing such a strong, self-sufficient, and brave heroine to the big screen. The titular warrior is truly an inspiring role model for children of all ages.

#78. The Three Caballeros (1944)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Norman Ferguson, Clyde Geronimi, Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts, Harold Young
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 6.3
- Runtime: 71 minutes

A mix of animation and live-action, "The Three Caballeros" is made up of a series of segments featuring Donald Duck as he travels around to various countries in South America. If the plot strikes you as odd, that's because it is. The film was one of the Disney company's contributions to the war effort under the Good Neighbor Policy, which sought to develop closer bonds with neighboring countries in an effort to keep Axis powers' influence at bay.

#77. Gigi (1958)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Directors: Vincente Minnelli, Charles Walters
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 82
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Runtime: 115 minutes

In "Gigi," the titular character has been raised to be a courtesan in the "family tradition," but isn't interested in the charms and etiquette she must learn in order to succeed, dreaming of love and marriage instead. While some of the topics in the movie might be on the more risqué side, they are talked about in such coded lingo they'd fly right over the heads of most children, who are sure to be more entranced by the central love story and musical numbers anyways.

#76. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Stanley Donen
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 102 minutes

Though it's based on the decidedly not family-friendly story, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" puts a wholesome, humorous spin on the tale. The musical comedy is about six uncultured, lumberjack brothers who are inspired to find love of their own after their oldest brother brings home a beautiful wife of his own. They go about it in all the wrong ways, however, attempting to kidnap the women they're interested in, much to the chagrin of their village.

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#75. The War of the Worlds (1953)

Paramount Pictures

- Director: Byron Haskin
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 85 minutes

A sci-fi film based on an H.G. Wells novel, the 1953 version of "The War of the Worlds" is far less scary than more recent editions thanks to its dated special effects (Oscar-worthy at the time) and more family-friendly tone. It sticks to the same story, about an alien war machine that crashes onto the Earth, and begins killing people at random. Their only hope for salvation? "The littlest things, which God, in His wisdom, had put upon this earth."

#74. Oliver! (1968)

Romulus Films

- Director: Carol Reed
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 153 minutes

Based on the Broadway musical adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic work "Oliver Twist," the movie's over-the-top characters appeal to children while adults can relish in the great storyline. The movie is about a young orphan who falls in with a group of street urchins led by the Artful Dodger and Fagin, only to have them turn on him when a wealthy target, Mr. Brownlow, offers him a home. Famed film critic Roger Ebert called "Oliver!" a "treasure of a movie."

#73. The Haunting (1963)

Argyle Enterprises

- Director: Robert Wise
- Stacker score: 80.4
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 112 minutes

While technically rated G, this low-key horror movie isn't suited for kids who are nightmare-prone. In "The Haunting," four people (an anthropologist, an ESP, a lonely woman with experience in supernatural events, and the heir of the mansion in question) set out to spend the night in a house that's rumored to be haunted and quickly discover that the old stories are true. The film would make a good watch around Halloween.

#72. Lassie Come Home (1943)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Fred M. Wilcox
- Stacker score: 81.0
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 89 minutes

The first installment in the "Lassie" series, "Lassie Come Home" follows a devoted dog as he treks from Scotland to England in search of his original owner. The family-friendly flick was one of Elizabeth Taylor's earliest roles—a far cry from the darker, more mature parts she'd prefer later on.

#71. The Road Home (1999)

Columbia Pictures Film Production Asia

- Director: Yimou Zhang
- Stacker score: 81.0
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 89 minutes

A beautiful love story, "The Road Home" tells the story of the courtship between Luo Changyu and Zhao Di via a series of flashbacks as their son returns home to their small village in order to make the necessary preparations for his father's funeral. The movie received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics, who even called it one of the best films of the year.

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#70. A Man for All Seasons (1966)

Highland Films

- Director: Fred Zinnemann
- Stacker score: 81.0
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 120 minutes

In "A Man for All Seasons," Sir Thomas More seeks to remain true to his convictions even in the face of treason charges that were leveled against him after he refused to help King Henry VIII obtain a divorce. The movie is not quickly paced, but it's historically accurate, and its message about remaining true to the things you believe in is one for the ages.

#69. Peter Pan (1953)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske, Jack Kinney
- Stacker score: 81.0
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 77 minutes

Upon his death, author J.M. Barrie left the rights to "Peter Pan" to the Great Ormond Street Hospital. When Walt Disney decided he wanted to adapt the story about the boy who never grows up, he had to make a deal with the hospital rather than the author's estate, which is more standard, in order to receive the animation rights. In the end, it was well worth it—the film grossed over $40 million after its initial release.

#68. A Bug's Life (1998)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton
- Stacker score: 81.0
- Metascore: 77
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 95 minutes

Inspired by Aesop's fable "The Ant and the Grasshopper," "A Bug's Life" is about an ant named Flick who makes a huge mistake that risks the life of his colony and must find a way to save them from the nefarious grasshoppers. Hours and hours of work went into animating this Pixar feature about insects, and the film's team pored over videos taken from a "bug's perspective" in order to get things just right.

#67. Not One Less (1999)

Bejing New Picture Distribution Company

- Director: Yimou Zhang
- Stacker score: 81.5
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 106 minutes

There are no professional actors in "Not One Less," a film from Yimou Zhang, who also directed such films as "Raise the Red Lantern" and "Shanghai Triad." Instead, the actual residents of the small village the film was shot in play its various characters, giving the movie an incredibly authentic feeling. The story is about a 13-year-old girl, Wei Minzhi, who is tasked to be a substitute teacher at the local school when the regular teacher, Gao Enman, is unexpectedly called away. Before he leaves, Enman instructs Minzhi to make sure all of the students are still there when he returns, as the school's subsidy is dependent on numbers; when one boy leaves in search of work, Minzhi goes to great lengths to find him and bring him back.

#66. The Muppet Movie (1979)

Henson Associates (HA)

- Director: James Frawley
- Stacker score: 81.5
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 95 minutes

The big-screen debut of the muppets, "The Muppet Movie" is an original story starring Kermit the Frog, who sets out to meet a talent agent in Hollywood, and is captured by Doc Hopper, an evil villain who sells frog legs in his restaurant. Miss Piggy, Fozzie, Gonzo, and the rest of the gang have to jump into action in order to save Kermit before it's too late. One of the most memorable scenes in the movie is the finale, which featured 250 different puppets who all had a unique role to play, and required Jim Henson to hire 150 extra puppeteers through the Los Angeles Guild of Puppeteers of America.

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#65. Animal Crackers (1930)

Paramount Pictures

- Director: Victor Heerman
- Stacker score: 82.1
- Metascore: 77
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 97 minutes

A pre-code Marx Brothers caper, "Animal Crackers" is based on the trio's Broadway musical of the same name. The comedic mystery has a loose plot that centers around a stolen painting, a Long Island party, and a foreign explorer.

#64. The Secret of NIMH (1982)

Don Bluth Productions

- Director: Don Bluth
- Stacker score: 82.1
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 82 minutes

An adaptation of the Newbery Award-winning children's novel, "Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH," "The Secret of NIMH" was made and directed by a whole team of former Disney animators. It's about a widowed mouse who must move her home and children before they're crushed by the farmer's plow. When one of her children comes down with an illness, she turns to the rats of NIMH, who have heightened intelligence. They give her a sacred object that will help her get the job done.

#63. Lady and the Tramp (1955)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske, Jack Cutting
- Stacker score: 82.1
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 76 minutes

"Lady and the Tramp," the 1955 Disney movie about a pampered pooch and a streetwise dog who fall in love, was first inspired by sketches that one of the animators, Joe Grant, made of his own springer spaniel. As the studio worked up a treatment to accompany the sketches, other influences, like a short story by Ward Greene titled "Happy Dan the Whistling Dog," were mixed in, in an effort to create a film that contained the classic Disney formula. Funnily enough, the movie's most classic scene, where the two pups share a plate of spaghetti, almost didn't make the cut, after Walt complained that it didn't really make much sense.

#62. The Winslow Boy (1999)

Winslow Partners Ltd.

- Director: David Mamet
- Stacker score: 82.6
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 104 minutes

Based on a 1940s play by Terence Rattigan, which was inspired by the true story of the Winslow family, "The Winslow Boy" is about the lengths a father will go to in order to clear his son's—and by association his own—name. After being accused of theft, Ronnie Winslow is expelled from his school, his father, convinced that his son is innocent, spares no expense in publicly clearing the boy's name, all but ruining the rest of his family in the process. A tense film at times, this movie places more importance on character development than it does on the plot, making it an interesting watch for adults as well as kids.

#61. The Longest Day (1962)

Twentieth Century Fox

- Directors: Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton, Gerd Oswald, Bernhard Wicki, Darryl F. Zanuck
- Stacker score: 82.6
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 178 minutes

A G-rated war film about the D-Day landings in Normandy, this flick probably isn't appropriate for young audiences or sensitive viewers, but it would be a great watch with older children and teenagers. "The Longest Day" shows what happened on several different fronts on D-Day, and provides a historically accurate and atmospheric retelling of the biggest event in World War II, making it both educational and entertaining.

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#60. Babe (1995)

Universal Pictures

- Director: Chris Noonan
- Stacker score: 82.6
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 91 minutes

One of the few children's films to have ever been nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, "Babe" is about a talking pig who learns he has talent as a sheepherder. A live-action movie, Babe and all of his farm friends are a mixture of real, trained animals and animatronic doubles, all of whom "speak" thanks to a computer program that made their mouths move in the correct patterns.

#59. Tarzan (1999)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Chris Buck, Kevin Lima
- Stacker score: 82.6
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 88 minutes

Edgar Rice Burroughs first came up with the character of Tarzan in his 1912 novel, "Tarzan of the Apes." In 1999, Disney studios brought the tale of an orphaned boy raised by kindly apes in the African wilderness to life. British musician Phil Collins wrote and recorded most of the music included in the movie.

#58. Yellow Submarine (1968)

Apple Corps

- Director: George Dunning
- Stacker score: 83.2
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 85 minutes

The Beatles (or at least their images) star in this animated film about a city called Pepperland that is under siege by the music-hating Blue Meanies. Pepperland's last hope, the group is called in to save the day by playing some of their hits, which the Blue Meanies stand no chance against. While this is touted as a Beatles film, John, Paul, George, and Ringo actually only appear in the final scene of "Yellow Submarine," but are voiced by other actors throughout the rest of the flick.

#57. The Music Man (1962)

Warner Bros.

- Director: Morton DaCosta
- Stacker score: 83.7
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 151 minutes

A massive hit the year it was released, "The Music Man" is yet another family-friendly movie based on a Broadway production. The classic musical follows a man (Robert Preston reprising his original stage role) who poses as a boy's band leader in order to con a small town out of their hard-earned money.

#56. Whisper of the Heart (1995)

Tokuma Shoten

- Director: Yoshifumi Kondô
- Stacker score: 83.7
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 111 minutes

Another Studio Ghibli movie, "Whisper of the Heart" is about an avid young reader named Shizuku who notices that all of the library books she's taken out have also been checked out by a mysterious young man named Seiji. Believing the boy to be her soulmate, Shizuku sets out on a journey to find him. The animated movie was based on a Japanese anime of the same name.

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#55. Footlight Parade (1933)

Warner Bros.

- Director: Lloyd Bacon
- Stacker score: 84.2
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 104 minutes

A producer comes up against challenge after challenge when he attempts to put on a show in "Footlight Parade." Released before the existence of the ratings code, the humor and dialogue can be a bit more risqué at times than you might typically expect of a G-rated film.

#54. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)

Walt Disney Productions

- Director: Richard Fleischer
- Stacker score: 84.2
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 127 minutes

In "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," Captain Nemo is an eccentric (and possibly mad) submarine captain who tries to cross the seven seas with his ragtag crew of captured sailors in tow. The group must uncover Nemo's real motive for the deadly journey before it's too late. While the story is, by now, a familiar one, viewers will delight in the extravagant set design that brings the story to life in an entirely new way.

#53. Forbidden Planet (1956)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Fred M. Wilcox
- Stacker score: 84.2
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 98 minutes

Very loosely based on Shakespeare's "The Tempest," "Forbidden Planet" is one of the earliest examples of a science fiction film. The movie is set in the 23rd century and follows a group of space explorers as they set out to discover what has unfolded on a now-deserted settlement. Over the last few decades, rumors have swirled that a remake is in the works, though we've yet to see one actually enter into production.

#52. Babette's Feast (1987)

Panorama Film A/S

- Director: Gabriel Axel
- Stacker score: 84.8
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 103 minutes

A Danish film, "Babette's Feast" is about the almost magical meal a refugee from Paris cooks for two sisters who are hosting her as well as their aging congregation and the impact it has on their small village. A commentary on art and divine grace, this movie is a true feast for the eyes and mind.

#51. The Secret World of Arrietty (2010)

Studio Ghibli

- Director: Hiromasa Yonebayashi
- Stacker score: 84.8
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 94 minutes

"The Secret World of Arrietty" is about a 4-inch-tall teenager named Arrietty who lives with her family underneath the floorboards of another family's home. On one of her above-board missions to gather supplies, she meets a normal-sized boy named Sho and begins to develop a relationship with him—a relationship that could threaten the safety and future of her people. This Studio Ghibli film is loosely based on "The Borrowers," a novel by Mary Norton.

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#50. One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wolfgang Reitherman
- Stacker score: 84.8
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 79 minutes

Artists drew more than 6 million spots in the course of animating the 1961 Disney classic "One Hundred and One Dalmatians." For viewers who have never seen the movie, it's part love story between Dalmatian parents Pongo and Perdita and their owners Roger and Anita, and part adventure story as Pongo and Perdita must save their own 15 puppies, plus 84 others, from the greedy hands of Cruella de Vil, who wants to turn them all into a coat.

#49. Old Yeller (1957)

Walt Disney Productions

- Director: Robert Stevenson
- Stacker score: 85.3
- Metascore: 84
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 83 minutes

Another movie you simply must have tissues on hand for, "Old Yeller" has been previously ranked as one of the "saddest kids' movies of all time" by Time. The Disney film is about an adopted yellow lab who proves time and again how loyal and worthy of love he is, before meeting one of the most tragic endings in the history of cinema.

#48. Sleeping Beauty (1959)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Les Clark, Clyde Geronimi, Eric Larson, Wolfgang Reitherman, Hamilton Luske
- Stacker score: 85.3
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 75 minutes

When "Sleeping Beauty" premiered in 1959, it did so poorly at the box office and with critics that Disney didn't release another fairy tale for 30 years, until "The Little Mermaid" in 1989. Critics found the linear-styled artwork "oppressive" and New York Times critic Bosley Crowther questioned whether the film was appropriate for young children due to the story's scary villain, Maleficent.

#47. Treasure Island (1950)

Walt Disney Productions

- Director: Byron Haskin
- Stacker score: 85.9
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 96 minutes

One of many adaptations of Robert Louis Stevenson's novel "Treasure Island," this 1950s movie was one of Disney's first attempts at a live-action adventure film. Bobby Driscoll, who played the main character Jim Hawkins, appeared in several more Disney films, including "Peter Pan."

#46. The Black Stallion (1979)

Omni Zoetrope

- Director: Carroll Ballard
- Stacker score: 85.9
- Metascore: 84
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 118 minutes

One of the best-loved horse movies of all time, "The Black Stallion" is about the bond shared between a horse and a boy as they're stranded on a deserted island together and then, upon their rescue, as they prepare for the most anticipated horse race of the year. It's beautifully shot and, as Roger Ebert noted, full of "terrific energy, beauty, and excitement."

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#45. Cinderella (1950)

Walt Disney Productions

- Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske
- Stacker score: 85.9
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 74 minutes

"Cinderella" is literally a tale as old as time, with the earliest known versions of the story dating back to the sixth century B.C. This version, popularized by the 1950 Disney animated film, is Charles Perrault's, which was written in 1697. The movie was a massive success, having been nominated for three Academy Awards, and essentially saved the studio, which was over $4 million in debt prior to the release.

#44. A Little Princess (1995)

Warner Bros.

- Director: Alfonso Cuarón
- Stacker score: 86.4
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 97 minutes

Frances Hodgson Burnett's other big novel, "A Little Princess" has also been turned into a film starring Liesel Matthews, Liam Cunningham, and Camilla Belle. The movie is about a young girl sent to boarding school who suffers a huge reversal of fortunes and must make the best of her poor new situation. It's a heartwarming and magical tale that's sure to be enjoyed by audiences of all ages.

#43. Planet of the Apes (1968)

Twentieth Century Fox

- Director: Franklin J. Schaffner
- Stacker score: 86.4
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 112 minutes

"Planet of the Apes" is now a full-blown franchise that includes many feature-length films over the decades, but it was this 1968 film that started it all. The movie is about three human astronauts who find themselves stranded on a planet where walking, talking apes are the rulers and humans are their slaves. A sharp social commentary, the movie doesn't sacrifice any action or adventure in the quest to make its point.

#42. Chicken Run (2000)

Aardman Animations

- Directors: Peter Lord, Nick Park
- Stacker score: 86.4
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 84 minutes

A stop-motion animation film, "Chicken Run" was released in 2000, but production on the picture had actually started four years earlier in 1996. Stop-motion is a very involved form of filmmaking, and it took a team 20 months to finish the principal photography, shooting 100 seconds a week in their most productive periods. The finished movie is about a group of fowl, led by the fearless Ginger and Rocky the Flying Rooster, who are trying to escape their evil owners at the Tweedy Chicken Farm.

#41. Captains Courageous (1937)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Victor Fleming
- Stacker score: 87.0
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 117 minutes

An adaptation of a Rudyard Kipling novel, "Captains Courageous" is about a spoiled young boy who is lost at sea only to be rescued by a Portuguese fisherman. His crew puts the boy to work. In the book, the main character is a 19-year-old young man, but in the film, he's aged down to 12 so that Freddie Bartholomew (an incredibly famous child actor of the time) could take the lead role.

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#40. Giant (1956)

George Stevens Productions

- Director: George Stevens
- Stacker score: 87.0
- Metascore: 84
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 201 minutes

James Dean's final film, "Giant" follows a Texas ranch family over the course of several decades as they struggle to adjust to change and wrestle with modernization. Elizabeth Taylor and Rock Hudson also star in the Academy Award-winning project.

#39. Monsters, Inc. (2001)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: Pete Docter, David Silverman, Lee Unkrich
- Stacker score: 87.0
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Singer-songwriter Randy Newman, a staple in the Disney Pixar world, won his first Oscar for the closing song of "Monsters, Inc." called "If I Didn't Have You." The touching ballad was a fitting end to the sweet comedy about the monsters under your bed, the central story of which is this: Best friends and colleagues, Mike and Sully, work for the most successful scream factory in the world and enjoy plenty of professional success until they accidentally let a human girl into Monstropolis, almost ruining everything.

#38. The Yearling (1946)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Clarence Brown
- Stacker score: 87.5
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 128 minutes

A tragic tale about the son of a Florida farmer and his pet fawn, the movie was praised by The New York Times' Bosley Crowther for its precise portrayal of the "innocence and trust and enchantment that are in the nature of a child [and] the yearning love and anxiety that a father feels for his boy."

#37. Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)

Kiki's Delivery Service Production Committee

- Director: Hayao Miyazaki
- Stacker score: 87.5
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 103 minutes

In "Kiki's Delivery Service," a witch-in-training named Kiki and her talking black cat set up a delivery service in their local community, which is threatened when Kiki begins to doubt herself and her abilities. Before the film's 1989 release, Studio Ghibli had been struggling and was actually on the verge of bankruptcy, but luckily for audiences everywhere, Kiki's success saved them all.

#36. Toy Story 4 (2019)

WatchMojo: Top 10 Movie Sequels of 2019 So Far

- Director: Josh Cooley
- Stacker score: 87.5
- Metascore: 84
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 100 minutes

Reviews have been decidedly mixed since "Toy Story 4" was released in 2019. Many critics raved about the film, praising its layered metaphors and the franchise's ability to reinvent itself, while many viewers expressed frustration over the storyline and choices made by the characters, which they felt weren't in line with the personalities they'd come to know and love. Whichever side of the debate you stand on, it's hard to argue that the movie wasn't a success, as it earned more than $1 billion at the box office globally.

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#35. Funny Girl (1968)

Columbia Pictures

- Director: William Wyler
- Stacker score: 88.0
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 151 minutes

Barbra Streisand's first film role—which also won her an Oscar—was as Fanny Brice in "Funny Girl." The stage musical turned film is about a vaudeville star whose career takes off as her private life—namely her marriage—begins to falter.

#34. The Odd Couple (1968)

Paramount Pictures

- Director: Gene Saks
- Stacker score: 88.0
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 105 minutes

"The Odd Couple" is a buddy comedy starring Walter Matthau (Oscar) and Jack Lemmon (Felix) as two polar-opposite best friends. After splitting up with his wife, Felix moves in with Oscar, but his neurotic ways soon get on his pal's nerves, threatening the pair's living arrangements. The movie is laugh-out-loud funny, so successful that it ended up being the inspiration for an ABC sitcom of the same name.

#33. The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)

Aardman Animations

- Directors: Steve Box, Nick Park
- Stacker score: 88.0
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 85 minutes

A parody of classic monster movies, "The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" is the fifth installment in the "Wallace & Gromit" series. The stop-action movie follows the good-natured inventor and his dog as they battle against a giant, veggie-loving rabbit who is single-handedly decimating the town's crops.

#32. Ponyo (2008)

Studio Ghibli

- Director: Hayao Miyazaki
- Stacker score: 88.0
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 101 minutes

A different sort of retelling of "The Little Mermaid," animated by Studio Ghibli, "Ponyo" is about a princess fish who wants to become human. After meeting and befriending a little boy named Sôsuke, Ponyo decides she will no longer be contained to the sea, but in the process of breaking free, she accidentally releases the magical Water of Life, which disrupts the balance of nature and threatens to destroy the whole world. Several recognizable stars lent their voices to the English version of the film, including Matt Damon, Tina Fey, Cate Blanchett, Liam Neeson, Betty White, Cloris Leachman, Lily Tomlin, Frankie Jonas, and Noah Cyrus.

#31. Bambi (1942)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: James Algar, Samuel Armstrong, David Hand, Graham Heid, Bill Roberts, Paul Satterfield, Norman Wright, Arthur Davis, Clyde Geronimi
- Stacker score: 89.1
- Metascore: 91
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 69 minutes

"Bambi" is based on a novel by Felix Salten, titled "Bambi, a Life in the Woods." While the novel is intended for adults, Walt Disney reworked the material about a young fawn and his forest friends to be appropriate for children. Some, including his own daughter, argue that he didn't change it enough, saying that he should have cut the entire storyline where Bambi's mother dies, which is truly one of the more tragic moments in the Disney canon.

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#30. The Little Mermaid (1989)

Walt Disney Pictures

- Directors: Ron Clements, John Musker
- Stacker score: 89.1
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 83 minutes

"The Little Mermaid" as we know it today almost never made it to the big screen. Initially, the CEO of Disney nixed the film entirely as the studio was already working on another mermaid picture. When he finally relented, the movie's most iconic song, "Part of Your World," nearly landed on the cutting room floor after the first round of test audiences weren't into it. Luckily, the production team stuck with their film, and the song is now a classic in many Disney song playlists.

#29. How Green Was My Valley (1941)

Twentieth Century Fox

- Director: John Ford
- Stacker score: 89.7
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 118 minutes

Set at the turn of the century in a Welsh mining village, "How Green Was My Valley" follows the Morgan family as they simultaneously mourn the loss of their way of life and look forward to a happier, easier future. Nominated for 10 Academy Awards, it took home five, including Best Picture and Best Director.

#28. The Straight Story (1999)

Asymmetrical Productions

- Director: David Lynch
- Stacker score: 90.2
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 112 minutes

A great American road movie about slowing down and focusing on what's meaningful in life, "The Straight Story" was inspired by a true event that occurred in 1994. In the movie, an aging farmer named Alvin Straight sets out to make things right with his younger brother Lyle, who has just suffered a stroke. Unfortunately for Alvin, he doesn't own a car, so he decides to make the multistate journey on his lawn mower.

#27. Mary Poppins (1964)

Walt Disney Productions

- Director: Robert Stevenson
- Stacker score: 90.2
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 139 minutes

Audiences around the world have adored the magical nanny Mary Poppins ever since she landed on the big screen in 1964. However, the author of the "Mary Poppins" books P.L. Travers famously did not enjoy the adaptation of her book series. When she attended the premiere of the movie, she reportedly cried through the entire thing, furious with Disney for bastardizing her tale.

#26. Aladdin (1992)

Walt Disney Pictures

- Directors: Ron Clements, John Musker
- Stacker score: 90.2
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 90 minutes

The late, great Robin Williams was truly one of the brightest gems in Hollywood. He particularly shines in his role as Genie in Disney's "Aladdin," which was designed, created, and scripted just for him. In order to convince him to accept the role, Disney animated Genie performing a number of Williams' own standup sets, which helped demonstrate to the comedian the amount of potential there was in the blue wish-granter.

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#25. A Summer's Tale (1996)

Canal+

- Director: Éric Rohmer
- Stacker score: 90.8
- Metascore: 91
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 113 minutes

"A Summer's Tale" is a French art house film about a young man named Gaspard who goes on vacation and finds himself in love with three different women for three different reasons. The romance film is certainly chaste enough to watch with the whole family, but as it's in French and deals solely with more adult relationships, it wouldn't make a good family movie night pick in homes that have younger audiences.

#24. My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

Tokuma Japan Communications

- Director: Hayao Miyazaki
- Stacker score: 90.8
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 86 minutes

Real-life sisters Dakota and Elle Fanning brought the English-language versions of animated sisters Satsuki and Mei to life in "My Neighbor Totoro" in 2005. The animated Japanese movie is about two sisters who move into a new house in the countryside only to find out that it's "haunted." Their new neighbor, a spirit named Totoro who can only be seen by children, introduces them to the friendly creatures that inhabit their new home.

#23. Toy Story 2 (1999)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: John Lasseter, Ash Brannon, Lee Unkrich
- Stacker score: 90.8
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 92 minutes

In the second installment of the "Toy Story" franchise, Andy heads off to cowboy camp for the summer, leaving his toys home alone for a whole season of adventures. After Woody is kidnapped by a toy collector, he discovers that he's a highly valued collectible with his own TV show and is at risk of being sent off to a toy museum. The rest of the gang must band together in order to rescue Woody and his newfound friends Jessie and Bullseye before Andy returns home.

#22. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Stanley Kubrick
- Stacker score: 90.8
- Metascore: 84
- IMDb user rating: 8.3
- Runtime: 149 minutes

When "2001: A Space Odyssey" premiered in 1968, its lack of a strong narrative or clear main characters caused many to hate it, and several of the day's biggest stars even walked out of the premiere. Today, it's often regarded as one of the most important and influential films of the 20th century. The movie becomes especially impressive when you consider that the computerized special effects so many sci-fi movies rely on today didn't even exist back then, and so many of the film's features, like the moon sand and the black monolith, were created entirely by hand.

#21. Dumbo (1941)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Samuel Armstrong, Norman Ferguson, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts, Ben Sharpsteen, John Elliotte
- Stacker score: 91.3
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 64 minutes

"Dumbo" premiered at the Broadway Theater in New York City in 1941, and The New York Times critic Bosley Crowther called it "the most genial, the most endearing, the most completely precious cartoon feature film ever to emerge from the magical brushes of Walt Disney's wonder-working artists!" The movie is about a circus elephant with unusually large ears. His ears get him bullied for most of his young life until he learns that they actually allow him to fly and he's able to take control of his own destiny.

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#20. The Wild Child (1970)

Les Artistes Associés

- Director: François Truffaut
- Stacker score: 91.8
- Metascore: 94
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 83 minutes

A story in the vein of "Tarzan" or "The Jungle Book," "The Wild Child" is about a young boy who has been raised by wolves. He's discovered by hunters and sent to Paris, where the kindly Dr. Itard sets out to civilize him. Shot in black and white, the movie, about the pains of adolescence, is regarded as a poetic masterpiece.

#19. The Circus (1928)

Charles Chaplin Productions

- Director: Charles Chaplin
- Stacker score: 92.9
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 72 minutes

The oldest movie on this list, "The Circus" was the last project Charlie Chaplin made during the silent film era. Despite its famously troubled production, the movie—featuring Chaplin's most famous character The Tramp, who evades pursuing officers by fleeing into the circus and posing as a performer—was wildly successful, earning Chaplin his first Honorary Oscar.

#18. A Hard Day's Night (1964)

Walter Shenson Films

- Director: Richard Lester
- Stacker score: 92.9
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 87 minutes

The second Beatles film on this list, "A Hard Day's Night," was actually the band's feature film debut. A mockumentary-style film, the movie coincided with their third studio album that shared the same name. Even so, long after its release, the movie remains a funny, irreverent look at the life of these rock 'n' roll idols.

#17. Ben-Hur (1959)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: William Wyler
- Stacker score: 92.9
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 212 minutes

"Ben-Hur" was a record-breaking movie in more ways than one. Not only did the film have the largest budget of any movie up to that point at $15 million, but it also took home 11 Oscars at the Academy Awards ceremony. A Christian story, though not a biblical one, the epic drama follows an Israelite Jew as he takes on the Roman Empire during the lifetime of Christ.

#16. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: William Cottrell, David Hand, Wilfred Jackson, Larry Morey, Perce Pearce, Ben Sharpsteen
- Stacker score: 93.5
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 83 minutes

Based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale of the same name, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" was Disney's first animated feature and the first full-length animated film in U.S. history. The project took three years to complete and was massively expensive—Walt Disney had to mortgage his own home in order to finance the production. But some 80 years on, it still remains one of the most beloved films of all time.

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#15. Finding Nemo (2003)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: Andrew Stanton, Lee Unkrich
- Stacker score: 93.5
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 8.2
- Runtime: 100 minutes

When his son Nemo swims too close to the surface at the beginning of "Finding Nemo" and is captured by a diver, overprotective parent Marlin must set out on an epic journey to save him. Ellen DeGeneres voices Marlin's absent-minded but devoted friend Dory who accompanies him in his quest. Beloved by audiences of all ages, "Finding Nemo" is a surprisingly scientifically accurate portrayal of marine life (minus the anthropomorphism, of course).

#14. My Fair Lady (1964)

Warner Bros.

- Director: George Cukor
- Stacker score: 94.0
- Metascore: 95
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 170 minutes

"My Fair Lady" is a movie musical starring Audrey Hepburn as the Cockney Eliza Doolittle turned proper lady and Rex Harrison as the phonetics professor who transforms her on a bet. The film version is the third iteration of the story, which started out as a stage play by George Bernard Shaw called "Pygmalion," then became a stage musical by partners Lerner and Loewe, before finally winding up as an eight-time Academy Award-winning film.

#13. Fantasia (1940)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: James Algar, Samuel Armstrong, Ford Beebe Jr., Norman Ferguson, David Hand, Jim Handley, T. Hee, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske, Bill Roberts, Paul Satterfield, Ben Sharpsteen
- Stacker score: 94.0
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 124 minutes

When a team set out to restore "Fantasia," the animated classical music concert, in time for its 50th anniversary in 1990, they had their work cut out for them. Disney's third full-length animated film, "Fantasia" is also the longest with a run time of two hours and four minutes. The length was not the only issue: the original negatives had been locked in the vault since 1946 and were in bad condition, and the original soundtrack had also been lost. In the end, it took the team two years to bring the movie back to its (almost) former glory.

#12. The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Directors: Victor Fleming, George Cukor, Mervyn LeRoy, Norman Taurog, Richard Thorpe, King Vidor
- Stacker score: 94.0
- Metascore: 92
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 102 minutes

The classic musical "The Wizard of Oz" stars Judy Garland as Dorothy, a young girl swept away from her Kansas home by a tornado, landing in the magical land of Oz, where she and her new friends—a scarecrow, a tin man, and a cowardly lion—follow the yellow brick road toward the Emerald City in order to obtain the deepest desires of their hearts. The often-imitated film struggled through several production challenges, like an ever-rotating cast of directors, on-set accidents, and costume paint that caused health issues for several cast members. But in the end, it came together, winning two Oscars and cementing itself as one of the most beloved films of all time.

#11. The Lion King (1994)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff
- Stacker score: 94.0
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Runtime: 88 minutes

"The Lion King" was advertised as the first Disney film to have a completely original storyline, though many argue that it was obviously quite heavily influenced by William Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Its degree of originality has never seemed to be an issue for audiences who flocked to see the movie about a pride of lions in the plains of Africa. "The Lion King" holds the title as the highest-grossing hand-drawn animated feature of all time, bringing in more than $986 million at the box office worldwide.

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#10. Pinocchio (1940)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

- Directors: Norman Ferguson, T. Hee, Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Bill Roberts, Ben Sharpsteen
- Stacker score: 94.6
- Metascore: 99
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 88 minutes

Very few of Walt Disney's early works were original stories, and "Pinocchio" is no exception. The 1940 animated flick was based on the 1883 Italian children's novel called "The Adventures of Pinocchio," which is about a puppet whose nose grows every time he lies. The movie won two Academy Awards for its soundtrack and featured an animated character who was reportedly Walt Disney's favorite—the kitten Figaro.

#9. Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Walt Disney Pictures

- Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise
- Stacker score: 95.1
- Metascore: 95
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 84 minutes

Six-hundred animators and artists worked on the 1991 smash hit "Beauty and the Beast." Their work was so impressive that the film became the first fully animated feature flick to ever be nominated for a Best Picture Oscar. Although they lost in that category, the movie—about a prince cursed to spend his days as a monster and the young woman whose true love may turn him back—brought home two other Academy Awards for its music.

#8. Toy Story 3 (2010)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Director: Lee Unkrich
- Stacker score: 95.1
- Metascore: 92
- IMDb user rating: 8.3
- Runtime: 103 minutes

"Toy Story 3" marked the end of an era in the movie's universe as Andy, now all grown up, heads off to college, and the toys find themselves in the hands of a new owner after making a pit stop at a day care center along the way. Hilarious and heartfelt, the movie will certainly be a tear-jerker for those who grew up alongside Andy and the toys.

#7. Ratatouille (2007)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Directors: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava
- Stacker score: 96.2
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 111 minutes

In "Ratatouille," a young rat named Remy dreams of becoming a gourmet chef, but his furry little body has proven to be an obstacle that's too big to overcome. Upon arriving in Paris, Remy teams up with a hopeless chef named Alfredo Linguini, exercising his skills through the human while remaining in hiding. His ultimate success proves, in the words of food critic Anton Ego, a character in the film, "a great artist can come from anywhere." 

#6. Gone with the Wind (1939)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Directors: Victor Fleming, George Cukor, Sam Wood
- Stacker score: 97.3
- Metascore: 97
- IMDb user rating: 8.2
- Runtime: 238 minutes

A Civil War drama starring Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable, "Gone with the Wind," remains the highest-grossing film of all time when adjusted for inflation. In total, the movie about a woman who's torn in love and fighting to restore her family's plantation, which won eight Academy Awards, has grossed more than $3.44 billion.

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#5. Toy Story (1995)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Director: John Lasseter
- Stacker score: 97.3
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 8.3
- Runtime: 81 minutes

"Toy Story" holds the record as being the first full-length film to be fully animated via computers. It's about a group of toys that comes to life when they're out from under the eyes of their watchful humans. When Woody and Buzz get left behind on moving day, the formerly feuding rivals must work together if they're going to escape the clutches of their evil neighbor Sid and be reunited with their boy, Andy.

#4. WALL·E (2008)

Pixar Animation Studios

- Director: Andrew Stanton
- Stacker score: 97.3
- Metascore: 95
- IMDb user rating: 8.4
- Runtime: 98 minutes

The last robot on Earth, Wall-E is destined to spend his days cleaning up the planet that has been trashed by humans. When he meets Eve, a robot who has been sent back to Earth on a scanning mission, he quickly falls in love and sets out across the galaxy to be with her. There are very few spoken lines in this film, but "Wall-E" still manages to pack an emotional punch.

#3. Modern Times (1936)

Charles Chaplin Productions

- Director: Charles Chaplin
- Stacker score: 98.4
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Runtime: 87 minutes

Charlie Chaplin's 1936 film "Modern Times" marked the last on-screen appearance of his character, the Little Tramp. In the movie, the character struggles to hold on to gainful employment in this modern, industrialized world. Along the way, he befriends an orphan girl with whom he joins forces, facing the world they don't quite fit into together.

#2. Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Directors: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
- Stacker score: 98.9
- Metascore: 99
- IMDb user rating: 8.3
- Runtime: 103 minutes

A movie about making movies, Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, and Debbie Reynolds sing and dance their way through "Singin' in the Rain." While the film, which came before the Broadway show, had an original script and original dance numbers, almost everything else in it, from the music to the costumes to the sets, had been borrowed from previous MGM films.

#1. City Lights (1931)

Charles Chaplin Productions

- Director: Charles Chaplin
- Stacker score: 100.0
- Metascore: 99
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Runtime: 87 minutes

The title for best G-Rated movie of all time goes to "City Lights" by Charlie Chaplin. The ultimate installment in the Little Tramp chronicles, the movie sees the character doing everything in his power to earn money so that he can take care of the blind flower girl he's fallen in love with. It's not until he accidentally saves a millionaire's life and earns a giant reward that he's able to do so, and everything begins to come together.

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